Sunday, September 30, 2012

KaleidoPain News Sept 30, 2012


"To lose patience is to lose the battle."
 - Mahatma Gandhi

*Tips for writing your own affirmations www.thesethree.com/Key_to_Affirmations.html
*Tips on journaling www.thesethree.com/Journaling.html

CELESTE’s BLOGSPEAK

Raising the roof on the article, “Fibromyalgia Patients Self-Medicating With Cannabis May Have Poor Mental Health Outcomes.” 
http://fmcfstriggerpoints.blogspot.com/2012/09/raising-roof-on-article-fibromyalgia.html#.UFtI1I1lTVI

Intimacy and Fibro: The nuts and bolts of the pelvic floor
http://fmcfstriggerpoints.blogspot.com/2012/09/intimacy-and-fibro-nuts-and-bolts-of.html
at Sharecare http://www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/blog/post/fc4f4e68-6b98-4e55-95ac-37357b130980

KaleidoPain News 9-11-12
http://fmcfstriggerpoints.blogspot.com/2012/09/kaleidopain-news-9-11-2012_11.html

Demanding body, cellular strength, LGS:  Are we what we eat?
http://fmcfstriggerpoints.blogspot.com/2012/09/demanding-body-cellular-strength-lgs.html

*Who Should Be Prescribing Our Pills?
http://fmcfstriggerpoints.blogspot.com/2012/09/who-should-be-prescribing-your-meds.html
On Sharecare http://www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/blog/post/006dd176-a756-40e1-8983-e8f9c2369f0f

*See past blog links at httpss://thesethree.com/Featured_Blog_Links.html
FEATURED BLOGS

Relieving Pain in America: How you can help to improve care. by nfmcpa
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nfmcpa/2011/12/09/relieving-pain-in-america-how-you-can-help-to-improve-care?utm_source=BTRemail&utm_medium=ShowReminder

Occupy CFS, Will FDA Step Up?
 http://www.occupycfs.com/2012/09/13/will-fda-step-up/


HEALTHY HABITS

Six ways to use your mind for healing
http://www.elephantjournal.com/2012/08/six-ways-to-use-your-mind-for-healing/?utm_source=All&utm_campaign=Daily+Moment+of+Awake+in+the+Inbox+of+Your+Mind&utm_medium=email

Tight Jean Syndrome
Wearing tight clothes can compress a sensory nerve called the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that runs from the abdomen through the thigh. The compression can cause numbness, tingling, and a burning pain in the legs above the knees, a condition called "meralgia paresthetica," also known as "tingling thigh syndrome" and now sometimes termed "tight jean syndrome." http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/TIP04494/Tight-Jean-Syndrome.html


FEATURING Q&A by Celeste at Sharecare
*Follow all answers by Celeste at  www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/answers

Who should I tell about my fibromyalgia?
http://www.sharecare.com/question/who-should-tell-about-fibromyalgia

Can my diet affect my fibromyalgia?
http://www.sharecare.com/question/can-diet-affect-fibromyalgia

How is dizziness in fibromyalgia treated?
http://www.sharecare.com/question/how-dizziness-fibromyalgia-treated

What qualifies a psychologist to treat my fibromyalgia?
http://www.sharecare.com/question/what-qualifies-neurologist-treat-fibromyalgia

ANNOUNCEMENTS
A note for everyone dealing with chronic pain.  Please know that many are working hard to realize, collaborate, and facilitate the Institute of Medicine (IOM) “Perspectives on Pain.”  The Patient Action Alliance to Implement a National Strategy (*PAINS) has established the mission, “To help Americans who struggle with pain have access to integrative pain care consistent with their goals and values."  I am happy to be affiliated with this group and make contributions as requested. See my note, https://www.facebook.com/notes/integrative-therapies-for-fibromyalgia/the-pains-action-alliance-to-implement-a-national-strategy-pains/525869224095152
For Grace’s Women in Pain,  ***An archive of the complete 2012 Women In Pain webcast will be available October 1st!  Please join us then to re-live the magic of our 5th Annual Women In Pain Conference!*** http://www.forgrace.org/women/in/pain/C265/
Women in Pain.

IN THE NEWS
Not on Twitter?  Follow my tweets on the bottom of the welcome page at http://TheseThree.com

Major changes needed to end inadequate pain management for millions, say Stanford authors of IOM study by Krista Conger.  Phillips Pizzo, Chair-IOM, Advancing Pain Research, Care, and Education; Dean Stanford University School of Medicine.
http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2011/june/pain.html

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Not Linked to Suspect Viruses; Study Puts to Rest Notion That XMRV or pMLV Cause the Mysterious Ailment
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918083907.htm
CII Press Conference: Multicenter Study on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.  W. Ian Lipkin, MD (Moderator)
http://cii.yewda.com/Blog.aspx?LOfRcb

NEWS FOR YOU from Celeste

Don’t miss the Sept/Oct edition of the National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Life, a journal for all patients in pain.  Featured, “Relieving Pain in America.”  An organization dedicated to doing just that. The online journal is at no cost, just click on the magazine icon at the bottom of the page.
http://fmcpaware.org/

What is a “Pain Activist?”
https://www.thesethree.com/Pain_Activist.html

How to Cope With Unsolicited Advice When You Have an Invisible Chronic Illnesshttp://invisibleillnessweek.com/2010/08/24/how-to-cope-with-unsolicited-advice-when-you-have-an-invisible-chronic-illness/

*Follow other “NEWS FOR YOU”  at www.TheseThree.com

ROLFING THE RESEARCH
September’s Research Updates with comments https://thesethree.com/Research_Sept__2012.html


BOOK REVIEW

How to Be Sick by Toni Bernhard
I earmarked too many pages to share all of them in this review, so I will share two that will forever be affirmations to me, finding joy in the joy of others, and implementing loving-kindness that I often give others, but seldom reserve for myself.  This book offers a personal journey and provides true enlightenment for those of us who cope with chronic illness.
--Celeste Cooper, RN, author, Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection, and FM expert at Sharecare.com  www.thesethree.com


ABOUT THE BOOKS 
www.thesethree.com/About_the_Books_WPCN.html


COMMENT CORNER
5.0 out of 5 stars Very information and helpful!, July 8, 2012
By TruthSeeker - See all my reviews
This review is from: Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection (Paperback)
Book is presented as a textbook and is easy to read with helpful explanations, definitions and exercises. Very informative on a variety of related syndromes/illnesses. My problem, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, is seriously misunderstood and misdiagnosed. Those of us who have it need verification and support, not to be dismissed as just crazy/lazy. Will share this book with many others.

POINT TO PONDER    (Sneak Peek from our soon to be released, Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See Saw of Chronic Pain, a series beginning with “Fall Devotions”)

How can I balance my teeter totter?

*This virtual newsletter is for informational purpose only and is not meant as medical advice.
Have the KaleidoPain News delivered right to your Inbox by subscribing to the RSS feed.
The KaleidoPain newsletter is for you, join in and submit one of your inspiring moments or book review's. Make a contribution and share with others. To submit contributions put "inspiring moment" or "book review" in the subject line and email to Celeste@TheseThree.com

Saturday, September 22, 2012

Peaks, Valleys and Villages – The Plethora © (Revised)



Having a plethora of painful conditions and autoimmune disorders provides me with a benchmark on my perception of life.

There are valleys, peaks and villages that are parts of personal growth. Focusing only on setbacks can stagnate who I am, like a river with no flow.

I see the valley as the peep hole. Though small, it provides vast awareness and vision. It is a comforting warranty for better times; this valley is abundant with lessons. If I embrace this place, I begin to see it is where animals come to escape the bitter cold of the peaks, where life thrives through a cycle; it no longer is a valley, but a village. If I stand still in this gathering place, I will feel the energy rise up through my feet, I will kiss my passion, embrace my anxiety, and be comforted by the cloak of truisms in my life and seek teachings to not covet the peak.

As I am drawn to the summit, I begin, “Once I get there I will….” “Oh, the glory I will see when I reach to top.” That day with be THE day I see my triumphs.” Then the duality of my spirit speaks, “Is seeing equitant with sight?”

The peak signifies victory; I am exhilarated by the pentacle, but this lesson is not to be taken lightly. As I reach the peak, I understand that without company, I am lonely; the tundra is high, yet sparse.  “Did I covet a place where all negativity would be resolved only to find the deep hole of my soul?” “Is this the true meaning of yin and yang, sin and forgiveness, right and wrong?”  The beauty of accomplishment gives me the overwhelming urge to sit a while looking out over the valley, where I saw my life as a peep hole of existence.  It’s not about the peak or the valley; it’s about the village, the landscape of my life.

I now understand it is the oscillation between the valley and the peak that brings balance and growth to my village. I accept that there will always be tragedy and triumph and that I will visit the dark as everyone must do to appreciate the light. I strive to learn in the valley, and continue to reach peak, but I will find comfort the village.

I have been given the gift of consciousness. This is my time to shine, to understand that I am more than my illness, and that living with illness for me is about improving reality, to find comfort in the peaks, valleys and villages, it is the plethora.

Celeste Cooper, author 

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Raising the roof on the article, “Fibromyalgia Patients Self-Medicating With Cannabis May Have Poor Mental Health Outcomes.”



I saw this article http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247729.php  (1), when it was first passed around the internet. Of course I looked for the abstract (2) as I always do, and the time has come for me to comment.

There are still people who don't believe fibromyalgia is real, despite the overwhelming scientific evidence otherwise.  https://thesethree.com/Research_Archives.html  This perception by the ignorant promotes low self esteem and depression, not fibromyalgia, as suggested in the report on the study involved.  

The Medical News Today, editor’s choice, does point out that the medications approved to treat fibromyalgia are under performing, so why are we not seeing comparative studies to see exactly what class of medications work best, including medical marijuana? Is our National Institute of Health willing to fund such research, and if not, why not?  Isn’t pharma biased in what studies they fund?

It is suggested in this article that those using medical cannabinoids for FM are of low socioeconomic status. What?  Moderate to severe pain greatly affects quality of life and knows NO socioeconomic boundaries.  The medications the FDA approved to treat FM potentiate cognitive deficit already known to exist in FM, create feelings of disconnection, and have far greater side effects than what has been reported in medical cannabis. Finding ways to avoid pain is a primal instinct, so why are such immoral, unethical statements regarding socioeconomic status made? Is it possible that those who use medical marijuana to control their pain so they can remain in the workforce are unwilling to participate in such studies?  Can you blame them with the current level of thinking the way it is? 

The editor’s choice suggests FM patients were taking opioids and some drinking alcohol.  I would imagine each of us knows patients on more than one medication to treat their fibromyalgia.  I imagine there are more people taking antidepressants that drink alcohol even though it is contraindicated. Do personal experiences allow us to dictate how someone else lives their life?  Last time I checked alcohol is legal for people over 21 in most states; and laws are different from state to state, and our government if fine with letting states regulate alcohol, but not medical marijuana?  Wasn't our great nation founded on rights to choose? 

Let’s report on all the studies, for instance, Fiz, et al, 2011 (3) found cannabis to be helpful in treatment FM pain. A published article reviewing the research indicates efficacy (potential benefits) in all chronic pain. (4). There is a line in the sand and neither side is all right nor all wrong, yet neither group is willing to cross the barriers of their own underpinnings.  This equates metaphorically to dropping the chronic pain patient in the deep blue sea without any regard to life and limb. Medical marijuana is legal in 17 states and DC, (5), and seven states have it on their ballot (6), so why is marijuana referred to as illicit in this report? I wish I could see more than an abstract to determine if this is reporter’s judgment.  Maybe we should all watch the documentary at Topdocumentary films: Medical Cannibus. (8)

Medical marijuana, opioids, anti-depressants, or anti-seizure medications, may not work for everyone, the later have had underwhelming results, while the former have long been known to be powerful analgesics, still each should be considered on an individual basis, considering personal belief systems and outcome. Should we demand the FDA approve Nabilone (8) for treatment of FM? Could cannabinoids be a natural alternative, leaving all the others in the dust?  

We are in the room people. We work very hard to integrate self-help therapies such as stretching, meditation, bodywork therapies, acupuncture, trigger point treatments, balanced nutrition, and journaling.  We have become experts on using helpful tools to deal with memory problems, physical restrictions, sleep disruption, preserving relationships and managing comorbid disorders. (If you aren’t doing these things, get our book now!).  Many of us participate in talk therapy, biofeedback, energy therapies, and hypnosis. Our lives are accompanied by ice packs, heating pads, TENS units, theracanes, tennis balls, topical analgesics, herbal and supplement trials, and a lifestyle that has been altered to minimize our pain. We are learning to redefine our lives to accommodate chronic pain and fatigue, and the financial hardship it brings.  

We deserve to be treated respectfully, and therapeutically.  We should not be impounded by the judgments and criticisms of others who have yet to walk a mile in our moccasins, nor should we be controlled and scrutinized by those whose goals are to make a buck off of our demise.  

We should all be fighting for the right of passionate, ethical, safe and effective management of pain that is shaped within our own conceptual framework, our personal beliefs.  Managing pain should be without judgment, it is a primal instinct, and words that depict crime should be a crime.

In healing and hope, Celeste  

(1)   Fibromyalgia Patients Self-Medicating With Cannabis May Have Poor Mental Health Outcomes.”  Medical News Today. Jul, 2012

(2)   Ste-Marie PA, Fitzcharles MA, Gamsa A, Ware MA, Shir Y. Association of herbal cannabis use with negative psychosocial parameters in patients with fibromyalgia. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2012 Aug;64(8):1202-8. doi: 10.1002/acr.21732.

(3)   Fiz J, Durán M, Capellà D, Carbonell J, Farré M. Cannabis use in patients with fibromyalgia: effect on symptoms relief and health-related quality of life. PLoS One. 2011 Apr 21;6(4):e18440.

(4)   Lynch ME, Campbell F. Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain; a systematic review of randomized trials. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Nov;72(5):735-44. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.03970.x.



(7)   Top documentary films: Medical Cannibus

(8)   Ware MA, Fitzcharles MA, Joseph L, Shir Y. The effects of nabilone on sleep in fibromyalgia: results of a randomized controlled trial. Anesth Analg. 2010 Feb 1;110(2):604-10. Epub 2009 Dec 10.





Monday, September 17, 2012

Intimacy and Fibro: The nuts and bolts of the pelvic floor


A hug a day keeps the psychiatrist away, right?

There are different forms of intimacy, and as human beings we all need and crave affection.  However, for the fibromyalgia patient sexual intimacy may be altered, particularly if you have pelvic floor dysfunction, impotence, endometriosis, vulvodynia, irritable bladder or interstitial cystitis known to co-occur more frequently in FM.

Be sure to discuss any problems with your doctor.  If you have a uro-gynecologist, a gynecologist that specializes in female urology, all the better.  They can help you get treatments that will improve pelvic floor pain and enhance your feelings for intimacy.  And if you are a man with fibro, discuss your problems with intimacy with a urologist.

Myofascial trigger points, part of myofascial pain syndrome, https://thesethree.com/Myofascial_Pain.html#What_is_CMP are great peripheral pain generators to FM, can cause a great deal of pelvic pain too.  In men it can cause impotence as well as pain, and for both men and women they can cause urgency and urinary retention and the pain can also include the rectum and bowel. 

Here is a great handout from UCSF/SFSU GRADUATE PROGRAM IN
PHYSICAL THERAPY on understanding trigger points and the pelvic floor.  Please note trigger points from other locations can cause referred pain, numbness and dysfunction. http://ptrehab.medschool.ucsf.edu/conted/spring_symposium2010/Goodrich.pdf

Make sure your vaginal area is moist because dry membranes, also prevalent in FM, can cause irritation and increase the risk of infection. 

If the pain is too severe, explore other ways of being intimate with your partner.


All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press and are not meant to replace medical advice.  http://www.thesethree.com

Contributing author to Fibromyalgia Insider Secrets: 10 Top Experts, 2nd Ed. Ebook complied by Deirdre Rawlings, ND, PhD http://www.fibromyalgiainsidersecrets.com/idevaffiliate/idevaffiliate.php?id=121_0_1_59

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

KaleidoPain News, 9-11-2012



“Use what talent you possess:  
the woods would be very silent if no birds sang except those that sang best.” 
~Henry Van Dyke, American author, poet, 1852 – 1933.


*Tips for writing your own affirmations www.thesethree.com/Key_to_Affirmations.html

CELESTE’s BLOGSPEAK




Notes:
Blogs also available at Sharecare www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/blogs


HEALTHY HABITS




FEATURING Q&A by Celeste at Sharecare



*Follow all answers by Celeste at  www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/answers

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Check out the announcement on the home page of www.TheseThree.com

“Everyone challenged by chronic pain - please join us wherever you are in the world on September 16th for a day sure to enlighten, inspire, educate and empower! To watch, simply view the live stream either here,  www.forgrace.org/women/in/pain/C265/  , on the 2012 Women In Pain 

Marly Silverman is retiring and she is handing off PANDORA (Patient Alliance for NEI Disorders Organization, Research and Advocacy) to capable hands. Read the news. 


IN THE NEWS


From FDA Approvals > Medscape Medical News, New Option for Constipation: FDA Approves Linaclotide by Nancy A. Melville 



Fibromyalgia has been unrecognized by the Social Security Administration in the listing of impairments.  Times are changing, “medically determinable impairment (MDI) of fibromyalgia (FM), “  see Social Security Ruling, SSR 12-2p; Titles II and XVI: Evaluation of Fibromyalgia.


NEWS FOR YOU from Celeste


More “NEWS FOR YOU”  at www.TheseThree.com 


ROLFING THE RESEARCH 

This months featured research at www.thesethree.com/Featured_Research.html


BOOK REVIEWS

I just finished reading an excellent book by Anita Moorjani called "Dying to be me". It is highly recommended for us, who struggle on a daily basis to live with this FM-thingie! Her book - about her Near Death experience and the resulting healing from stage 4B Lymphoma puts it all into perspective. To say I finally made peace with my illness is an understatement.
--review by Elke Hutton

"When Movement Hurts: A Self-Help Manual for Treating Trigger Points" by Barbara Headley MS PT. It gives many of the most common trigger points. The muscle sections contain associated diagnoses, signs and symptoms, causes, management tips, and prevention hints. There is a chapter that deals with other causes of muscle pain, one on exercise, and one on repetitive stress, and one dealing with chronic postural stress. The author is an authority on trigger points and well loved by many of us in the field. Her teachers included Janet Travell and David Simons.
--Review by Devin Starlanyl, author and advocate for fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome.


ABOUT OUR BOOKS  


FEATURED WEBSITE OR BLOG!

The National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association.  I hope you will join me by supporting the NFMCPA however you can.  They work behind the scenes, collaborate, educate, advocate, and network within political and health organizations that are striving to make a difference in our lives.  (Disclaimer, I do not work for the NFMCPA) 

How To Get Well From ME (CFS)? 10 Areas Of Treatment To Look At by GetWellFrom ME.  [Inspiring overview, Cc] 

Fantastic presentation for some patients with fatigue, with valuable information. Which Endocrine Problems Cause Fatigue And How Does Salt Affect This? - Dr. Friedman (VIDEO)


COMMENT CORNER 

This review is for: Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection (Paperback) 5.0 out of 5 stars The holistic approaches presented are great resources for anyone dealing with these conditions!, July 8, 2012 
By Lyn, Massage Therapist 

I know how debilitating these conditions can be for my clients and how important it is for them to gain control in managing their symptoms. This thoroughly researched book provides a variety of practical solutions to managing a myriad of symptoms. The science is presented in easily understandable terms; the focus on mind, body and spirit is truly integrative. Tips provided for dealing with the challenges of securing treatment in our broken health care system are not found in other books. This is an excellent resource! 


POINT TO PONDER    (Sneak Peek from our soon to be released, Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See Saw of Chronic Pain, a series beginning with “Fall Devotions”)

Do I exude the pleasures I seek in others? 


Have the KaleidoPain News delivered right to your Inbox by subscribing to the RSS feed.

The KaleidoPain newsletter is for you, join in and submit one of your inspiring moments or book review's. Make a contribution and share with others. To submit contributions put "inspiring moment" or "book review" in the subject line and email to Celeste@TheseThree.com

*This virtual newsletter is for informational purpose only and is not meant as medical advice.


Sunday, September 9, 2012

Demanding body, cellular strength, LGS: Are we what we eat?



The old saying “We are what we eat,” still holds true, but the benefit versus consequences ratio is much lower than it once was. 

Our bodies rely on food for cellular and brain metabolism.  Leaky gut syndrome (LGS), has been strongly linked to autoimmune disorders.  Autoimmune disorders, where the body’s immune system manufactures antibodies against its own tissue, are on the rise, almost at epidemic levels.

Some autoimmune disorders known to cluster with fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Lupus (SLE), Sjögren’s, thyroiditis, Raynaud’s disease, autoimmune dysautonomia, interstitial cystitis, chronic Lyme disease, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, and possibly others depending on the individual. 


Leaky Gut Syndrome ©

The purposes of the bowel are to break down food into nutrients and eliminate waste or unwanted products. Leaky gut syndrome (LGS) causes body-wide symptoms because of holes in the intestinal barrier. Due to this breakdown, the bowel does not function normally and does not filter out some harmful substances, such as bacteria, toxic waste products, food additives, infectious agents, and inflammatory substances. These irritants initiate an immune response, causing inflammation. With this disruption to normal bowel function, the immune system leaves the gut open to infections and yeast overgrowth, causing not only gastrointestinal symptoms like bloating, gas, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, but other feelings of ill health......

Book excerpt (Cooper and Miller, 2010)


So how do we minimize the chance of developing Leaky Gut or treat it?

There are specific tests to confirm LGS so discuss your symptoms with your doctor.  Take precautions by eliminating known irritants to the bowel, including certain foods, (Gluten if you are known to be intolerant or have Celiac disease), medications such as NSAIDs (Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (when possible), and alcohol. 

According to Sharecare health expert Dr. Leo Galland, http://www.sharecare.com/question/how-manage-leaky-gut-syndrome , we should adopt an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern. The principles are simple to understand:
  • Avoid foods with added sugar and refined starches made from white flour.
  • Decrease consumption of saturated fat and most vegetable oils, using extra-virgin olive oil instead. Eat at least 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
  • Eat at least 4 servings of fish per week.
He also says there are dietary supplements that help the small intestine heal and restore its functional integrity, which are readily available in health food stores. The most important of these are:
  • Amino acid L-glutamine and
  • Amino sugar N-acetyl-glucosamine
It is difficult to find preservative free foods these days, and even fresh vegetables can be toxic because of pesticides.  (see 9 foods likely to have pesticides at http://www.doctorshealthpress.com/food-and-nutrition-articles/the-nine-foods-most-contaminated-by-pesticides. )  There are consequences for everyone, but especially to those of us who already have a dampened or dysfunctional immune or endocrine system.  Many of the chemicals used to preserve our food, artificial flavoring and color are toxic. When in doubt, eat fresh, preferably organic.  Not everyone can afford organic, so here is a link on how to clean vegetables and fruit.  http://suite101.com/article/how-to-wash-pesticides-off-fruit-vegetables-a174074

Today the industry is big business because we need to feed the massive amount of people in the world today.  For this reason we must advocate for the food industry to find or revert to safer methods of preserving our food.  In a world where so many have nothing to eat, it is a bitter sweet reality.

Deirdre Rawlings, ND, and PhD in nutrition asked me to write a contributing chapter to her E book, Fibromyalgia Insider Secrets: 10 Top Experts.  She is extremely educated in these matters and she reports on the plethora of information regarding nutrition and why we should be more concerned about eating healthy to fight the rise in autoimmune disorders.

This blog can also be found at Sharecare, http://www.sharecare.com/user/celeste-cooper/blogs

All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press and are not meant to replace medical advice.  www.thesethree.com





Sunday, September 2, 2012

Who Should Be Prescribing Our Pills?

As with anything in the business world, medicine has its own specialties.  This is for a reason.  It is impossible for an orthopedic surgeon to do say, “open heart surgery.” The same holds true for our medications.

Certain specialists are experts at certain medications and have a greater knowledge of them.  I fear a general
practitioner, for instance, does not have the expertise for prescribing antidepressants.  Shouldn’t it be a psychiatrist prescribing these medications?  The same holds true for antiepileptic medications, which should be prescribed by a neurologist, someone who is astute at and specializes in looking for neurological clues.  I challenge anyone to get their podiatrist to prescribe something for a cold. So, why are all of these medications being thrown around as though they are candy placebos?

We now know that chronic pain of any sort requires a multimodal approach.  Shouldn’t this include specialists to prescribe medications for a particular disease or problem? 

Maybe we should ask why classifications for these drugs are what they are.  Why aren’t they classified as analgesics, if that is truly what they are made of?  Maybe we should ask our doctor what they know about the medications they are prescribing, what to watch for, and what to report. Just some points to ponder.

All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press and are not meant to replace medical advice.  www.thesethree.com

Author of Chapter Five, Living with and Coping Effectively Through Fibromyalgia: Detecting Barriers, Understanding the Clues, in Fibromyalgia Insider Secrets: 10 Top Experts, 2nd Ed. Ebook complies by Deirdre Rawlings, ND, PhD

Celeste's Website

Celeste's Website
Click on the picture